Social work and end-of-life care

Social work is important in end-of-life care

Archive for January 2015

Further evidence of uneven and slow responses to Deprivation of Liberties assessments

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http://s7.addthis.com/static/r07/bookmark048.html#

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Written by Malcolm Payne

30 January 2015 at 10:01 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Improving long term #community_care is more important than expensive medical marvels: research needed in details of #social_work practice

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“Safety concerns cloud early promise of powerful new cancer drugs” – http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN0KZ0BZ20150126
This article from a financial news service illustrates a number of points. It’s of interest to people in palliative care, because so many people with cancer need end of life care with a lot of medical input and there’s a historical link between cancer medicine and palliative care. The article illustrates the detailed research and complexity involved in medical decision making in what to the outsider is a ‘give em the drug or not’ scenario. Would that we could have the same degree of research and understanding of the detail of social work. And the response of the financial journalist here, shows that what medical issues arise in financing health care is instructive in providing a different perspective to what we often hear (for insurance read NHS funding issues). And again, people die and will continue to do so and will need psychosocial help with this life transition no mater what expensive medical marvel the doctors come up with. The troubles in NHS emergency care at the moment remind us that it’s  good long term community care that counts most for most of us.

Written by Malcolm Payne

29 January 2015 at 11:11 am

Posted in Uncategorized

We need to think how rural end of life care would look like for people in isolated communities

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http://www.care2.com/causes/a-way-to-bring-end-of-life-care-to-remote-communities.html

This naive American article would be impossible to write in the same way in a European country where countrywide standards of service are the norm. But it raises an important professional issue that we do have to think carefully about what end – of – life care should look like for people in more isolated rural areas, and plan it appropriately.

Written by Malcolm Payne

20 January 2015 at 12:35 pm

Posted in care, End-of-life care

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Complexities that lead to risk – useful practice ideas

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In a very thoughtful short article on risk and complexity (something  any social worker would be interested in), this specialist risk consultant says there are three things that connect risk and complexity :
– if there are lots of parts and interconnections
– if there are uncertainties, so there are changes and disruptions, and
– if it is time constrained,  so you don’t have time to think and plan.
Link to article on risk

Written by Malcolm Payne

13 January 2015 at 11:48 am

Posted in social work

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Death of Robert Adams, writer and social work academic

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IRobert Adams’m sad to hear of the death on New Year’s Eve of Robert Adams, my long-time co-editor and co-author, with Lena Dominelli. I have known him for forty years, since he was running a Barnardo’s youth project in Pontefract and I was an area social services officer, responsible social services in for a mining community nearby and involved in intermediate treatment for young people as it was called then.

The photo is from a joint project we were involved in between Teesside University and Uzbek universities in 2010. He worked hard with colleagues there to develop social work education, and was also involved in palliative care there, but was most strongly associated with Humberside Polytechnic/University which later became the University of Lincoln. He was also involved in generating the open learning courses and publications of the Open Polytechnic project, and his edited Foundations in Health and Social Care text many years later reflected a similar concern for well-thought-through learning materials for beginning students that were also intellectually challenging. He was a visiting professor ion a variety of places including Lund University and the University of the West of Scotland, where, in 2008, he delivered the Morag Faulds memorial lecture.
Link to information about Robert from Teesside University
Link to Teesside blog, with posts from Robert
Link to Robert’s Wikipedia entry:

Most of all Robert saw himself as a writer, and he was also an active publisher and a leading member of the Writers’ Guild. Many social workers will not know of his crime novels and stories, and there were also children’s books, poetry and other writings.
Link to the Writers’ Guild obituary

Among his successful professional writing were two important research books on protests in prisons, drawing on his early career in the Prison Service, and on protests in schools. The prison riots book received high praise from his Honour Judge Stephen Tumin, the former Inspector of Prisons: ‘This is among the handful of prison books – they include George Jackson’s Soledad Brother and Michael Ignatieff’s A Just Measure of Pain – which moves and informs. The sociology of prison riots, the causes of outbreak and the nature of the reactions, are subjects which have been largely ignored and need to be understood by those who either study criminal justice or work in the system.’
Link to Protests by Pupils: Empowerment, Schooling and the State (Falmer, 1991)
Link to Prison Riots in Britain and the USA (Palgrave Macmillan, 1994)

Among his best-known social work texts were the long-running book on empowerment, used over the generations by students, and the three large, frequently-updated books (known by those involved as ‘Big Macs’ because they were published by Palgrave Macmillan) edited by Adams, Lena Dominelli and myself. These aimed to provide a politically and socially critical perspective on learning materials for people entering social work. We were working on a further revision and his last email, sent on from his computer after his death, demonstrated a continuing lively and creative interest in social work and its future.
You can search for these and many of his other social work books on the Palgrave Macmillan website.

Our editorial meetings across the years were argumentative, funny, acerbic and creative. We all benefited from his quiet strength, his thoughtful radical perspective on the world, and his creativity, imagination and sense of fun. I am sad that Lena and I will never experience another.

Written by Malcolm Payne

9 January 2015 at 12:44 pm

Posted in death and living

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A social worker and a grandparent – an important contribution to society

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Jean StogdonAn inspiring life history of a social worker’s contribution to society. And an example of what you can achieve as a grandparent and in your later life.

Written by Malcolm Payne

7 January 2015 at 4:05 pm

Make sure you distinguish depression from grief, otherwise you can’t work properly on bereavement

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This aca20150103 Jamademic review of studies of complex grief treatment provides support for treatment methods, but the main point of the findings is to make sure you distinguish between depression and grief – otherwise you don’t get the chance to work on the bereavement.

Written by Malcolm Payne

6 January 2015 at 12:55 pm

Posted in bereavement

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