Social work and end-of-life care

Social work is important in end-of-life care

Archive for the ‘bereavement’ Category

Useful article on grief at work: When A Coworker Loses A Loved One

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/laurashin/2015/06/08/grief-at-the-office-when-a-coworker-loses-a-loved-one/

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Written by Malcolm Payne

9 June 2015 at 7:53 pm

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Hope Again: new Cruse website helping young people with bereavement

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Written by Malcolm Payne

28 March 2015 at 5:40 pm

Make sure you distinguish depression from grief, otherwise you can’t work properly on bereavement

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This aca20150103 Jamademic review of studies of complex grief treatment provides support for treatment methods, but the main point of the findings is to make sure you distinguish between depression and grief – otherwise you don’t get the chance to work on the bereavement.

Written by Malcolm Payne

6 January 2015 at 12:55 pm

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Memorial reminds us of the distress of childhood death

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Another of my pictures of memorials – I found this one in Cartmel Priory in the Lake District this summer, in the part of the Priory that used to be a local church – an immense memorial to an obviously much-loved child, who died at the age of nine. A reminder that death in childhood was common at one time, but the distress it caused was nevertheless always real. And so much of the world still experiences that distress far too often.Cartmel Priory memorial to a child who died at 9

 

Written by Malcolm Payne

30 September 2014 at 12:17 pm

Public policy neglects funeral costs for people living in poverty – international study

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This interesting article argues that public policy neglects funeral costs as an issue for people living in poverty; it reports a pilot international study.

From the Cradle to the Grave: Funeral Welfare from an International Perspective Valentine 2013 Social Policy & Administration Wiley Online Library.

Written by Malcolm Payne

20 September 2014 at 3:11 pm

Different kinds of meaning help us understand what’s going on

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20140915 EJPC A quick post to give you a link to info on an article I wrote in the new edition of European Journal of Palliative Care. It’s on ‘meaning’ and argues that not everybody searches for meaning in their lives as they approach the end of life, and not every issue of meaning is a spiritual care one. This link is to a brief summary on the European Association of PC website, which links to the article in the journal (the brief is free but you have to have a subscription to the journal to read the full thing or go to a library). It says you can get a 10-minute subscription to download something you want, but it doesn’t say how much that costs; probably an unreasonable amount; but many people reading this will probably have access to a library that takes it.

Link to my article on meaning.

Bereavement, resilience and drift

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I’ve always been interested in resilience as an idea that is useful to social workers; in a chapter I called it the ability to bounce back from adversity. But it’s interesting to see a completely different take on something we come across in practice. One of the main uses of ‘resilience’ in policy is in civil defence: it’s about the capacity of a community to bounce back from a disaster like a plane crash, or from a nuclear attack

I’ve been reading a computer expert’s slide show (you can see it here); it’s by Vincenzo de Florio and it’s about antifragility, that is how to stop a computer system from ‘drifting’ away from what you want to it do. In this context, he defines resilience as ‘a system’s ability to preserve its identity through active behaviour’. A system in the social work context would be an individual or a family. Identity is the fact that your relationships and activities work for you. Active behaviour is what you do to make your life work, and the quality of your life depends on your capacity to achieve the things you want to achieve in your life. I find the idea of drifting away from achieving what you want useful too.

So, to use the example of bereavement, grief may cause you to drift away from the main directions in your life, and bereavement work helps you to pull yourself back to the main directions you want in your life.

Written by Malcolm Payne

1 September 2014 at 1:00 pm

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